Ali Wren

whole-hearted living, healthy-minded eating

Stay in Your Lane

Hayley Morgan cheers other women on in their passions and dreams. Her confidence and creativity are quintessentially contagious to women in all walks of life.

How does she overcome the comparison trap?

I try to keep my eyes on my own lane. Just like driving, if you take your eyes off the road for too long you’re going to be swerving into oncoming traffic or into someone else’s lane. When I get down to the heart of it, I want my life and work to be authentic to me, not beautiful so-and-so who is driving along beside me. -Hayley E. Morgan

We all have those friends who appear to have the good life. Everything seems to come easy for them. That couple who gets pregnant right when they try. They have the perfect house, the perfect church, and the perfect kids. Then there’s that friend with the perfect body. And the sweetest husband. And the cleanest house.

You’re thinking of that friend (or friends) right now, aren’t you?

Comparing ourselves to the perceived perfection of others is a dangerous place. By focusing on others’ paths, we lose our own story.

I want to “keep my eyes on my own lane,” as Hayley says, and live the life and story that is authentic to only me.

These three truths help me keep my eyes on my own lane:

1. Remember that God has called me to live a different story.

When I focus on the story I have been called to live, I am able to experience freedom and to enjoy–and embrace–my journey.

2. Ask God to help me use my energy and passion to steward my life well.

Over and over again, I am learning to surrender my fears, doubts, and insecurities in exchange for dreams, and hopes, and to focus on the talents and originality I bring to the world.

3. Cultivate gratitude for the people, gifts, and blessings I do have.

Gratitude really does change everything. There is so much to be grateful for, and I’m learning to make gratitude a daily practice in my life. 


What helps you keep your eyes on your own lane?


Love, Ali xo

(This is part of a series from write31days.com. To see all posts in this series, click here.)

About Ali

I'm Ali. I write about my journey of living a full and healthy life with food allergies, overcoming the comparison trap, and cultivating authenticity.

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  • I so agree. Staying in my own lane and living the life I am called to life. I often find myself comparing myself to other wife’s and mom’s. I needed this reminder.

    • Thanks for taking the time to comment, Ruth! I hope you stick around for more posts throughout the month, and I’m so grateful to hear that this reminder spoke to your heart.

  • Oh this is GREAT! Something else that I have to remind myself, is that nobody’s life is as perfect as it seems. We can so easily take those pretty glimpses we see on instagram, and then assume that they’ve got it all figured out. But I keep learning more and more, that no one does. And yes, God has given us each our specific story on purpose for a purpose. The life we’ve got IS the good life. 🙂 Trying to remember this myself, daily!

    • You are so right, Ali! Nobody’s life is as perfect as it SEEMS. “The perceived perfection” is so dangerous. Yes, the life we have IS a GOOD life. Amen!! XO

  • fromthissideofthepond

    I love your theme. Keeping a mental gratitude list helps me stay in my own lane. I read somewhere that if everyone threw their problems into a pot, and you had to choose one, you’d probably choose your own. I’ll enjoy following along with your 31 posts.

    • Thank you so much! A mental gratitude list–yes!

  • You are so right– gratitude really is essential! We have the quote “gratitude makes what I have enough” hanging in our kitchen. It’s a great reminder.

  • Tonya L

    when I was a teenager my mom would tell me to be like a racehorse. She’d say what do they put on them during a race? I Don’t know! She’d say blinders on each of their eyes to only see what’s in front of them & focus on their race.